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Dental Spray, Does It Work?


By wunderpup - Posted on 08 November 2008

Has anyone had any experience with "dental sprays" or "dental gels" for dogs? My dog has a couple of health problems and I don't want to put him under for a dental cleaning. So far his teeth are pretty good with only a little bit of tartar. I heard that "Leba Lab III" spray works well but is expensive, has anyone here used it? I heard there are a couple of dental gels too. I don't remember their names. If someone has information and is willing to share it I'd be most grateful.

My 8+ year old mixed breed dog is quite healthy, but has plaque build-up on her back teeth. Last year, my vet recommended beef rawhide chews for plaque removal - however this dog is not a "chewer" - upon receiving a rawhide chew, she promptly buried it in the yard. (God love her!)

Last week, I saw Plaque Blast in a discount store, and decided to give it a try. It's quite easy to use, and in just one week I am noticing results. In fact, it's working so fast that I plan to cut back to once a day, and then perhaps just periodically. I do worry about the alcohol and/or other chemicals.

Just my two cents' worth.

My dog gets raw veggies, lean meats, top quality dog kibble and chlorophyll with grape seed in it. It is like giving him a blood transfusion, cleans his system including bad breath.

animal medicines

I have been doing the research on the sprays for my aunt so I have read all of the above posts. Some of these stories are heartbreaking... I rescued a badly abused 9 year old chihuahua who was terrified and would bite anyone who went near her and I was only meant to foster her but ended up adopting her as she had so many behavior problems. After working with her gently and never forcing her ( and yes I can relate with the vets phoning me telling me to come and get her now!!), I can now scale her teeth as well as brush them with CET tooth paste and I have 3 dogs and 2 cats and am on long term disability and I cant remember the last time I paid to have their teeth cleaned as they dont need it and their vet is thrilled with their condition; gums are healthy and as I have nursing background I know what I am talking about. Yes I do brush my cats' teeth as well. It is all about going slowly, gently, with lots of patience and most importantly and never forget this part, you have to make it worth their while with a really good/special treat when it is over!!! That is why they will let you do it again, that plus lots of positive praise. I dont believe these sprays address the plaque under the gumline but that is just my opinion and you are paying big money for these items as well. If you are diligent with the brushing you will never need the scaler and you should not use a scaler unless you know what you are doing as you can damage the surface of the tooth causing more problems than you started out with.

In regards to one persons comment, there is no such thing as a 'quality kibble'. If the pet food scare taught me something it taught me that...so now I make my own with my vet's approval...in fact they designed the diet and I simply follow it... Cats, are obligate Carnivores...they have to eat meat, so the more protein the better...and no the canned cat food does not have enough protein and the dry food, dont even go there! Again, for more information, read this book (you can get it from the library)it is called "Your Cat; Simple New Secrets to a Longer, Stronger Life. by Dr Elizabeth Hodgkins, DVN ISBN: 0-312-35801-6 She is the vet who blew the whistle on the pet food scandel and has a vet practise strictly for cats and feeds her cats just meat (balanced meat diet) and basically has been able to decrease or eliminate kidney disease and diabetes by doing so and she talks about this among other things. My vet has read the book and adopted her practises and has also seen similar results.

Another informative book, "Not Fit For A Dog;Truth About Manufactured Dog & Cat Food". by Dr Michael Fox ,DVM; Dr. Marion Smart,DVM(also a PhD in animal nutrition); & Dr. Elizabeth Hodgkins, DVM. ISBN: 978-1884956-83-6
There are also cat and dog food recipes in the book which were also reviewed and approved by my vet ( I paid for the privilage),however you should have your vet review them as well for your animal prior to using. This book is also available in the library. The information in these two books was quite eye opening and well worth reading in my opinion and the reason why I make my own food for my animals.

I know this is a bit off topic but I see people with a lot of various problems and I believe the information in these books regarding the diets will be very helpful...parts of the books may not pertain to you but just skim through to the ones that are.

It is very interesting when reading your comment..... I have twin ( born within the same birthing sac) male/female maltese/pug dogs. THey are very very adorable as a matter of visitors to our vets have often told me if they both were not so yappy they would make great dog models... ANyways i have used every breather/tartar control product you could imagine since they were born and nothing has kept the tartar at bay. My little man needs t be put down have hgave his upper two front teeth removed as well as a back tooth and his sister requires her bottom two teeth removed. I am terrified of putting them under to have their teeth removed and cleaned and am praying and hoping that they will just fall out. I recently started wondering if plaque blast could have possibly created such decay. it breaks my heart to think that i have properly cared/brushed my little loves teeth yet some other supplement that i thought could be a additional positive could cause something so terrible. i would never suggest plaque blast to any other doh owner i know.... #plaqueblastispoison, #plaqueblast, #dontuseplaqueblast

Thank you members! Good info. I plan to ask our vet, but otherwise I like what I read about Leba Lab III.

I've been curious about these sprays, too. My old cranky dog hates everything and never would let me mess with her mouth-she even hates to be brushed and is always shedding by the handful. I have to give her a few swipes as i walk by. what dog doesn't love to be brushed? anyhow-she's had to have teeth pulled in the past few years-she's 11 or 12. I think her teeth are starting to bother her and I hate to put them through it again-the vets, that is. she really is mean. i have to go in the back and stay with her until she's knocked-out. i'm told to pick her up after 5:00, but they call around noon, begging me to come and get her NOW. what an ordeal!

i just stumbled upon a site endorsing a dental spray that contains NO ALCOHOL called DentaSure. it's expensive, but i might try it.

good luck with your dogs choppers!

I have been using Denta Sure for two weeks on my toy poodle. His teeth was getting pretty bad also his breath. Did not want to have to put him under also costly. I have used it for two weeks now and his teeth look really good. What a change in a short time. Also breath is just fine. He does not seem to mind the taste at all. I do it twice a day for a month and then just once a day to keep teeth white. Hope this helps.

As with most issues, getting to the root of a cause is, at times, challenging. Dental issues will not resolve themselves, and if you have waited until the dog's breath is overwhelming, then you have waited too long to address the problem. At this point, you need to have the professional dental cleaning. Some preexistent conditions will play a role in the dogs's dental health: poor immune health, poor quality diet, and disease such as diabetes. Many conditions can be helped by a higher quality diet that would in turn improve the immune system. Fourteen years ago, after educating myself about the commercial pet food industry, I started to cook for my cats and dogs. In my area, you cannot find a quality food in grocery or variety stores. The key factors in food selection are education, reading food ingredient labels, and not blindly trusting products just because the company name is well known: Neither Science Diet, Iams, Purina, Ol Roy, Beneful, and others are quality pet foods. Animals are usually subjected to eating the same thing every day for their entire lives. They are doomed to poor physical and dental health because their immune system's are in poor health--poor health leads to poor health.

My dog also does best with home cooked food. I am curious about cooking for a cat though. My cat can only eat Royal Canine Vet Diets. He will not eat canned food. So I am indeed concerned about his nutritional needs. Cooking for dog isn't difficult but cats? How and what do you cook for your cat? Thanks

Check out this site, she does NOT sell ANYTHING! It is strictly about CATS needing MEAT real MEAT!! Not grains and vegetables as they can NOT digest them like dogs. Cats are obligate cannivores. THEY NEED MEAT.

My Jazzmine is presentely on Hills MD, basically because when I adopted her she was very overweight, and DIDN'T do it to HERSELF!!

KIBBLE kills cats!! Period. It is like long term poison, which we have been brainwashed into believing is worth paying the HIGH cost to kill them!!

I plan eventually to put Jazzmine on the slightly baked raw diet. Since I can't stand the idea of feeding her rabbit, I don't know yet what the second will be, but I know she WILL eat the almost raw chicken/turkey thighs. This article is a DON'T MISS, if you LOVE your cats!!

It also gives you ideas & ways to gradually change your cat over from dry food to canned, and/or then to raw diet. Best wishes, and REMEMBER the MORE educated we ARE on ours & their NEEDS the LESS we can be taken advantage of by money grubbers who don't MIND getting rich off of killing our loved ones!

www.catinfo.org/

Sincerely, Toni De & Jazzmine kitty

You didn't answer the question! You went on an on about what causes dental problems. The question was, "Do dental sprays and gels work?" Stay on the subject, please. I had the same question and your reply was useless to me!

I'm appalled at the lack of gratitude for the advice given. You were clearly told that they do work and you also got some extra info.
You are repulsive to make such a rude comment. I feel sorry for your pet!

1st sentance in LebaIII advertisement describes death of a patient during a routine dental procedure (no history of patient/health/laboratory/anesthetic protocol,etc). Any product ad that begins with a scare tactic should be carefully examined. This product claims to protect other dogs from what happened to this patient. First, dental disease is caused by PLAQUE, not tartar. Plaque, then tartar, below the gumline is the real culprit and can only be dealt with by hand scaling or ultrasonic scaling. We humans tolerate the procedure, pets do not, therefore anesthetic is required to do an adequate job. Those who claim anesthetic free cleaning are being charged a tremendous fee for something that has virtually no value other than appearance. Let's use common sense here, if people that brush several times per day, floss, still require dental prohphlaxis every 6 months, how could you believe a water spray with some herbs/alcohol would solve virtually the same problem in a pet. Please ask you dentist what they think of a product like this!!!

I read the article as well; there are double blind studies that have been done and quite a bit of research on this if you look.
I have been using Leba III on all of my dogs (3) since May of last year. One of them is quite elderly ( going to be 16 in March) and have HUGE success. The tarter is GONE from their teeth. They kind of resist the spray, but it comes with an applicator if you want to do it that way, but I find the sprying isn't so bad. Keep in mind to not let your dog eat or drink half an hour before or after applying. This product is worth the cost, my vet is VERY impressed!! No more dentals for just cleaning!!

Just found your post from a few years ago. How did that stuff work on your dogs teeth ? We have one yorkie who has a bad problem. We just had his teeth cleaned 5 months ago and just had to do it again. This is getting to be expensive to say the least.

Gene
banjoguy12701@yahoo.com

I used leba 111 on my dog who has very bad teeth and it worked great but I am all out and cannot find any again. I know it is expensive but if it saves you from getting their teeth cleaned and putting them out once a year it is worth it. I brush my dog's teeth everyday when not using it but the brushing doesn't do as good a job it seems

You can purchase Leba III online through Amazon and it's a lot cheaper than what I paid for it at my pet food store. I've been using it for a week on my dog who is in need of dental work. I'm not sure yet how it will do on his tartar but his breath is a whole lot better!

My vet prescribed Leba III for our 10 yo Greyhound who had kidney disease plus dental disease. The dog could not undergo anesthesia. Then I started using it on my other 3 dogs. It really works well. No teeth cleaning at all in over a year. It is expensive but gets much cheaper if you buy more at one time plus it has a 10 year shelf life. It has 25% ordinary alcohol (like vodka) but after the first month or so, you only use one small spray per day. Everyone says no, no to Listerine which is 21.6% alcohol. I don't know why. If you put it in a spray bottle like Leba lab's, I don't think one spray would be swallowed. I am reluctant to try Listerine even though other people say it is fine. It is not approved for dogs and cats.

I read an article this month I think in Parade and it said there are drops you add to your dog's water to prevent plaque build up. My 4 y.o. Dachshund is having a cleaning 10/3, and when I asked the vet about them, of course they never heard of it. But, I found it (I think) on Google and it's called Biotene and it's $14 on Amazon. I'm gonna get it. My chihuahua doesn't get the build up and breath like my Dachshund does. It's supposed to be a 60 day supply. If it works, I'll be thrilled. Cleanings are so expensive!

First, the active ingredient in these products is alcohol, which can be dangerous to some pets, especially with liver and kidney disease. I wouldn't want alcohol sprayed on my gums if they were inflamed. Second, if these products really worked, why wouldn't the companies go after the big bucks and sell them for humans? Hmmmm....
Also, the dental disease that affects other parts of the body and causes tooth is below the gum line, so all of those "dental scrapers" doing "cleanings" are missing the most important area of disease.

Umm....they do sell dental products that are mainly alcohol to people. It is called mouthwash

True, but people know enough to spit it out. Dogs are just gonna swallow the stuff. :)

I've not used any of the other brands listed above. I have, however, used a product called Canine Mouth Drops. Its like a herbal mouth wash for dogs and also freshens their breath too! I love it and my dogs loves it!dental problems treatment

I tried Leba III for over a year on my dog and PetzLife gel for over 8 months. He didn't mind Leba IIIs taste but hated PetzLife. I would say there was only a small difference and neither of them helped that much. :(

Hello,

Does anyone know the side effects of Tropiclean Gel on canine kidney failure? I read that it contains grain alcohol.

I hope to get an answer soon.

Thank you

My dog has the worst breath in the world and the cost of getting his teeth cleaned is too much. I saw PlaqueAttack on TV, and I want to order it, but I found that some people thought it was a scam, and there were mixed reviews. I really need something quick to save me from this stench, have you guys ever tried plaqueattack? does it work? Thank you!

My dog gets raw veggies, lean meats, top quality dog kibble and chlorophyll with grape seed in it. It is like giving him a blood transfusion, cleans his system including bad breath.

hmmm. I thought grapes were dangerous for dogs??
I use Pet Life Oral Care Spray form Natural Pets in Boulder CO and the vets say my pommawawa has the best gums and teeth for his age, 13. And...he is still in need of a prof. dental cleaning.

I understand cleaning their teeth is expensive but it is imperative to their health. If you have not been cleaning them then they need to get cleaned and you can then go to products to keep them clean. Your dog could get heart disease - this isn't about YOU needing a quick fix for their breath. It's for them. Don't you think their teeth hurt just like yours? Look, I don't make a lot of money either but please skip a couple of new jeans, find a cheaper vet, eat a can of tuna fish for lunch, anything... but save up and get them cleaned. Their life will be greatly shortened if you are worried merely about your own embarrassment or comfort.

I just had my dog's teeth cleaned two months ago, and the vet said he's already building up plaque. He hates having me use the doggie toothbrush. I have no problem paying the money ($500!) to get his teeth cleaned every two years, but 1) they shouldn't be building up plaque after two months and 2) the fewer times he has to go under anesthesia, the better. Has anybody found anything that worked?

I have been doing the research on the sprays for my aunt so I have read all of the above posts. Some of these stories are heartbreaking... I rescued a badly abused 9 year old chihuahua who was terrified and would bite anyone who went near her and I was only meant to foster her but ended up adopting her as she had so many behavior problems. After working with her gently and never forcing her ( and yes I can relate with the vets phoning me telling me to come and get her now!!), I can now scale her teeth as well as brush them with CET tooth paste and I have 3 dogs and 2 cats and am on long term disability and I cant remember the last time I paid to have their teeth cleaned as they dont need it and their vet is thrilled with their condition; gums are healthy and as I have nursing background I know what I am talking about. Yes I do brush my cats' teeth as well. It is all about going slowly, gently, with lots of patience and most importantly and never forget this part, you have to make it worth their while with a really good/special treat when it is over!!! That is why they will let you do it again, that plus lots of positive praise. I dont believe these sprays address the plaque under the gumline but that is just my opinion and you are paying big money for these items as well. If you are diligent with the brushing you will never need the scaler and you should not use a scaler unless you know what you are doing as you can damage the surface of the tooth causing more problems than you started out with.

In regards to one persons comment, there is no such thing as a 'quality kibble'. If the pet food scare taught me something it taught me that...so now I make my own with my vet's approval...in fact they designed the diet and I simply follow it... Cats, are obligate Carnivores...they have to eat meat, so the more protein the better...and no the canned cat food does not have enough protein and the dry food, dont even go there! Again, for more information, read this book (you can get it from the library)it is called "Your Cat; Simple New Secrets to a Longer, Stronger Life. by Dr Elizabeth Hodgkins, DVN ISBN: 0-312-35801-6 She is the vet who blew the whistle on the pet food scandel and has a vet practise strictly for cats and feeds her cats just meat (balanced meat diet) and basically has been able to decrease or eliminate kidney disease and diabetes by doing so and she talks about this among other things. My vet has read the book and adopted her practises and has also seen similar results.

Another informative book, "Not Fit For A Dog;Truth About Manufactured Dog & Cat Food". by Dr Michael Fox ,DVM; Dr. Marion Smart,DVM(also a PhD in animal nutrition); & Dr. Elizabeth Hodgkins, DVM. ISBN: 978-1884956-83-6
There are also cat and dog food recipes in the book which were also reviewed and approved by my vet ( I paid for the privilage),however you should have your vet review them as well for your animal prior to using. This book is also available in the library. The information in these two books was quite eye opening and well worth reading in my opinion and the reason why I make my own food for my animals.

I know this is a bit off topic but I see people with a lot of various problems and I believe the information in these books regarding the diets will be very helpful...parts of the books may not pertain to you but just skim through to the ones that are. What they eat affects their whole body including the state of their mouth.

Cheers.

Your comment "the more protein the better" shows how little you really know about what is good or bad for cats. That is a dangerous, deadly statement. Protein MUST be very carefully regulated in cats because their kidneys can be permantently damaged by too much protein intake.
And any product with alcohol (like sprays for teeth) should be avoided also for the same reason, kidney damage. Especially when you're supposed to dose the animal twice a day for two weeks. It adds up. A tiny bit of acid will destroy metal just as surely as a flood of it will, it's just slower. Cats' kidneys are notoriously delicate.

Cat kibble is NOT deadly for cats. BAD, cheap, "common" kibble is (Friskies, Meow Mix, etc...). They are loaded with chemicals, preservatives, and cheap by-product crap.
Saying that cats don't eat greens is ridiculous. They do eat them. That is why cat owners need to be careful about what plants they have in their homes. Many, many cats die every year from ignorant pet owners due to having toxic plants in their home. And cats eat grass to make themselves vomit. Greens are just not a regular staple in a cat's diet. But select, quality greens are good for cats and dogs.

Below is covering a bit of what found in various parts of this section, so it may be seen as "off topic" but it's relevant.

Many people think that anything that a human can ingest is okay for an animal.... you're completely wrong if you think that.
Asprin will kill a cat (it's safe for dogs though). Grapes and raisins (especially) kill both cats and dogs over time. Onions (onion powder or salt) kill cats and it is found in many many things that humans give animals (including broth and soups). Stop feeding your animal human dinner scraps!! Do you think that the amount of salt or the chemicals included in human foods is good for an animal?
Milk is fine for kittens but is NOT good for a cat past one year old.
Chocolate is deadly to dogs and cats.

I feed my cats Chicken Soup for the Cat Lover's Soul. No preservatives (it done with tocopheraol... Vit. E), no artificial colors, flavors, or chemical additives. No gluten, no by-products.
All of the cats that I have had since the 1960s have lived to 18 years or older. All in excellent health.

People who have or want to have an animal companion need to educate themselves. There a lot of people depending on sites like this asking others who have no idea what they are talking about for information instead of asking a knowledgable vet and reading books on proper care of the animal concerned.

Dr. Pitcairn's New Complete Guide to Natural Health for Dogs and Cats (he is a professor of animal medicine at U.C. Davis),
The Complete Medical Guide To Cats by Robert Perper, DVM/PhD and Edward Kepner, V.M.D., and the
Cat Owner's Home Veterinary Handbook by Debra M. Eldredge DVM, Delbert G. Carlson DVM, Liisa D. Carlson DVM, James M. Giffin MD are excellent resources for accurate, reliable information.

Asking total strangers (no matter how well-intentioned they may be) on websites about what is best for their animal shows how little energy and effort people are willing to put forth for their pet's well-being. And in reading what some people have stated on sites shows how little most people know about animal care. Some information is not only wrong, but deadly.
If you truly CARE about your pet..... educate yourself by spending time reading quality medical guides and talking to your Vet.

So Anonymous are you trying to sell a book or something? you've posted the same rant about "research for your aunt" TWICE (maybe more) in the same forum and you went WAY OFF TOPIC!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! I just want to read about people that have used the sprays and gels.

End of August 2010 my dog Cody and I went for a walk, we came home, I was so proud of this 14 year old poop! Then he laid in the grass, trembled for quite some time. That's when it all began. It was touch and go for some time and he made it!

October he had majority of teeth removed. The rotting teeth made him septic, nearly killed him. His kidneys were nearly destroyed. He gets 150 ml of Ringers Lactate 5-6 out of 7 days a week. He hates the "kidney diet" food the vet gives so I read up on it and do my own. He also gets Mylanta, 1 teaspoon, once or twice a day depending to bind the phosphorous and remove it with the extra fluids.

Because I failed to part with the $$ for necessary dental care he suffers. I say bite the bullet, get it done. If he is older do a complete blood panel and see the condition of his body BEFORE going under surgery. Anesthesia for an older animal could kill him. Blood work tells you what you are dealing with.

Just like humans if you let your teeth go it will ruin your heart, kidnesy, and liver. Will wreck your body. Do what you can. It's not cheap but rest assured you will know you did all you could and aleviate his toothaches. You are the dog's only hope, your call, you are the dog-parent and only one who can get him help.

Maybe there is a vet school in the area where you may get a discount; or buy clothes from Salvation ARmy for a while to off set the cost. This is part of being an animal parent.

I have been a pet dental Hygineist for over 15 years.
Non-anesthesia is the best way to go. Look up Non-Anesthesia
Pet dental in your local browser . It should give you
Choices of tech's that are working under the Supervision
Of a Vet . It's cost effective and your dog goes home
With the hour .

Maybe with all of his problems, it;' time to have him put to sleep. I had to do it for my 17 year old pomi-poo and it just about killed me. I do understand the point you're making is to take care of their teeth. We all do what we can and sometimes we can't afford dental for ourselves, let alone our pets. So, try to brush them, etc. but have compassion and don't let your dog suffer because you can't fathom living without him. It's just not right'

What a horrible thing to say- oh no! the animal cost him money so put the poor thing to sleep. Read what he said, his negligence created a problem for his dog which he solved, but wish he forked out the money for cleaning. That was the point. Just because a living thing is an inconvenience to you, you run to pts- the animal is not suffering, but his negligence created a problem again the point.

If you can't afford to take care of yourself then don't have pets- having pets then putting them to sleep because they are suffering due to your negligence is irresponsible to say the very least. what horrible advice.

I fully understand where both sides are coming from I really do but let me explain my situation and most other tender hearted people in my area. First of all let me say that I am thinking of getting some of this if I can here soon afford it because it is better than nothing. But where we are the pets are getting euthanized by the thousands and that is not including the ones that are on the streets. I saw 2 cats in the walmart parking lot the other night and took some food out of the bag of catfood I bought and gave them both a big fat pile of it. Most people around here are filled to the brim with tons of cats and dogs cause people just dump them off in our driveway and I can't stand to see them starve but then try to find a good home for them..ha! Impossible. So with my 5 cats and 4 dogs and my mom lives next door with 2 dogs and we lost our home, business, and most of our possessions within the last 1 1/2 yrs because my husband almost died with a brain bleed. So 3 brain surgeries, a mild stroke and partial loss of vision and my health is not very good we are forced to try for disability and are currently depending on family and food stamps to live. Now I love my pets I truly do and if I had the money they would want for nothing but under the circumstances unless someone wants to pay for them a expensive dental cleaning is out of the question for me much less my pets. We have a hard time buying cat and dog food much less anything else so this is what we have to do. I will say we have been blessed with healthy pets because 2 dogs are 13 and 1 cat is 12 and the male dog has never even been neutered and they are still lively and happy everyday so I am thankful for that. Thanks everyone for answering this question. I am sure my vet would say it is better than nothing. GOD Bless!

I would highly recommend you get some labs done...same with my dog, Cody.
Had many teeth removed. Six months later smell started to return, I tried brushing, etc (no sprays or gels) ended up within 2 years of many teeth removed I caused his current kidney failure situation due to the teeth were beyond cleaning, made him sick, septic, and he now has 25% of his kidney function. "We" are on Ringers Lactate 150 ml once a day for the rest of his life, and if you know anything about it, make sure you use 1 1/2 inch 20 gauge needle and go just under all layers of the skin to get the fluid into him.

Letting the teeth go will not only affect heart, liver, but literally ruin the kidneys; same a humans. If you let your teeth go and rot it will kill you. If you need to do a loan to get those teeth cleand DO IT! Cody has lasted about 1 year, but is loosing the battle. He was 28 pounds and now 12. What does your pet mean to you? I love my dog like he was a child and will do what I can afford. Avoid all this hastle and do the dental and don't put it off.

Many sites on internet on dog oral care, teeth cleaning, you may even have a school in your area for a reduced rate. If he is older, do the labs to make sure he will make it thru the anesthesia. Odds were very high agaisnt Cody makig it. It will be 1 year from the major extractions in October.

I have used Leba Lab 111. Check out the website. It is really easy to use and is a natural product.

Hi there,

This is in response to the fellow up there who mentioned difficulty getting close to the mouth area in handling the dog. I was aware that this may happen with my German shepherd so began handling his feet, playing with his teeth and mouth and engaging in play and petting since I got him as a three month old. He is now a whopping 70 lbs at 7 months only and estimated to grow up to 120+ according to his breeder due to his lineage. I'm at least relieved to report that he is exceptionally calm, tolerant and actually quite regal while I brush his teeth every other day. I have been brushing his teeth like this at least three to four times a week. His teeth are pearly white.

Although most things are hard at the beginning and introducing the finger toothbrush and odd tasting stuff early on was no exception, I must say: keep at it. It will pay off. I was very nervous too at first but stayed the course. It was pure horror at the thought that a 120+ lbs dog would be uncontrollable, misbehaved and worse, with bad teeth or breath that steeled my nerves. He's a hit at the vets. Do not waver. Do your research early and set out the right routines and habits and your pet will grow into these good habits. Be the leader he or she looks to you to be! Brush early and don't lapse. Best wishes. J

I have two small dogs and they sqirm out my hands anytime I have a tooth brush or finger brush, never tried wash cloth. The taste is OK of toothpaste; they don't hate it, think it's a treat. They try to lick it off and run away or sqirm out of my hands. I got to the point where I just let them lick it off my fingers and try to get it on their fronts. (Vet said that's better than nothing and MAYBE some day they'd let me.) BUT even when they were puppy's they wouldn't let me clean their teeth and have always hated their paws played with. I can't do my one's nails to this day and she's 8 now. I don't think you understood the question, it's to late to go back and some dogs just don't like it. The question was what do we do now and do these products work not what should we have done when they were puppies.
Plus, it's one thing to have a 10lb dog that is agressive when you try to open their mouth and force something down it and a whole different story when a 80lb dog does it. Good for you.....next time, write an answer to the question.

I'm going to try them; sounds like they've worked few people! :)

I have read about people here trying to find alternatives to the dental cleaning procedure done by vets.

I hope to find an althernative also because of not wanting the anesthesia for an older dog.

I do think cleaning is fine (with all the pre-op testing) for younger dogs.

And this is only my experience that happened and not mean't to dissuade people.

I truly regret having my 16 year old dog get the professional pet cleaning, which when combined with the pre op blood work and best procedures (not the cheap checklist they provide) and the additional costs for pulled teeth - that sure adds up, I was quite expenditured out. But was going to be worth it for her health.

Or so I thought and that was represented to me.

She already had slightly compromised kidneys and the anesthesia can be hard on them (found this out later). She got a uti and had to be put on antibiotics. Then would not drink and they had to pump her full of water because of dehydration.

She died weeks after this procedure.

Plus I had the pay the additional costs due to all the complications.

Ask your vet to explain any complications and a list of the expense chart for that!

Not to mention the suffering of my dog.

Never again on an much older dog.

No reason to use anesthesia on dogs to clean their teeth. There is anesthesia-free cleaning and I had it done today on my 3 and 6-year old cavaliers. It took 15 minutes at a local pet store, a vet was present (which was great since one of my doges had a mild case of gingivitis and they sent me home with antibiotics). Cost was $125 (in Los Angeles) so it was also a lot cheaper than taking him into the vets for anesthesia/cleaning. I can't recommend this process highly enought. I'm taking my dogs in every 6 months going forward.

Jeez people, have some common sense!! Does your dentist give you antibiotics for simple gingivitis? No! And the anesthesia free cleaning is a useless esthetic procedure. It does not address the root cause of periodontal disease (which can lead to cardiac disease, kidney disease, ...), SUBgingival biofilm and calculus. SO, great, your dog's teeth LOOK better, but his health is still at the exact same risk it was before! I am a veterinary tech AND a registered dental hygienist and i'm telling you, ALL of these alternatives to professional cleaning are total quackery! Seriously, if these products work, why on earth would they not be produced by Crest or Colgate for PEOPLE?! c'mon pet owners, use your darn brains!

The person who is the vet tech and dental hygienist for humans has a point. If it were so good then the huge toothpaste companies would be falling over themselves to develop for a larger market ( humans). Using the no-anesthesia cleaning is like painting a car without removing the rust first. The plaque becomes calculus, calculus becomes an irritant setting up an inflammatory response ( gingivitis) and the whole process progresses to periodontal disease in which bone is lost and teeth get loose. By the time perio is present the disgusting smell of dead tissue causes bad breath.
I wish it were true for my best pal but "if it sounds too good to be true, maybe it is"

Can you provide the name of the pet store please? I'd like to call them and ask about the product they use. I have mini-schnauwer that has always had problems with his gums. I take him to the vet regularly for teeth-cleaning and would welcome another alternative. Thanks for sharing about your find!

Be careful of Lebalab III, Plaque Attack, and any other product that contains any kind of alcohol (ethyl, grain, etc.). Dogs and cats cannot metabolize the alcohol so it can be very dangerous. Check out side effects and emergency procedures for alcohol poisoning in dogs...
http://www.aspcabehavior.org/articles/71/Foods-That-Are-Hazardous-to-Dogs-.aspx
http://www.vetinfo.com/alcohol-poisoning-dogs.html

AT

I have used both Leba III and the PetzLife gel and still struggle to clear my dog's teeth of tartar. I think it depends on your dog's mouth chemistry. I have seen an improvement using both (not at the same time) but it took 6+ months, not 30 days. Still, it is a good choice rather than put my very old dog under for teeth cleaning.

hello I read your comment and thought I would share my experience I have a now 13 year old pom her teeth were really bad I did not realize how important teeth were to health. She became very ill and I almost lost her she had 5 teeth pulled and had her teeth cleaned while under. It took about two weeks before she was back to running like the wind and 1 year and three months later she is doing great but getting back to why I am really writing Tina just had a non anastetic dental I cancelled the first two appointents because of my own fears but after talking to my vet who's own senior dog gets this procedure I knew it was best for tina. Tina came out smiling with pearly whites and an excellent report. The people who started this are out of california and they travel to florida and some other states. I am taking my 10 year old adopted pom may 20th it is not as expensive and when a pet is older the risks are far less so I hope this will help in some way take care.

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